Stichwort 'Englisch'

Being poor is too expensive

Donnerstag, 22. Oktober 2015 - 02:15

http://lifehacker.com/being-poor-is-too-expensive-1736233505

Creeping Dictatorship

Montag, 19. Oktober 2015 - 17:19

http://www.salon.com/2015/10/17/margaret_atwood_on_our_real_life_dystopia_what_really_worries_me_is_creeping_dictatorship/

Academia.edu Layout Changes

Samstag, 19. September 2015 - 00:04

2015-09-18: Academia.edu layout changes: The thumbnails are nice, but some good things from the former layout are missing. All my posts disappearded, also a post which contained links to different papers on J. E. Millais.

The former right and left colums where quite helpfull and well organized. The site lost valuable structuring elements. Has Academia.edu been downsized?

Bugs:

  • 2015-08-xx: In the article views INFO more|less does not work with vanilla Firefox. So readers can’t read the abstract. But it works with browsers like IE, Midori, QupZilla and Vivaldi.
  • 2015-09-19: Clicking on *own* articles now ads this access to the statistics. Related bug: Clicks to some links within Academia.edu lead to pages which say that I am not logged in anymore.

Links:

Neoliberal Science

Dienstag, 4. August 2015 - 06:23

STS (Science and Technology Studies) and Neoliberal Science
by Rebecca Lave, Philip Mirowski and Samuel Randalls
(https://www.academia.edu/7999084/Neoliberal_science and
http://sss.sagepub.com/content/40/5/659):

In this special issue, we focus on the particular impacts of neoliberalism as a regime of scientific management. Drawing on a wide range of studies from other fields, as well as the four cases in this issue, we argue that while there are important differences in how neoliberalism has been implemented across nations and disciplines, there are a set of key principles and common outcomes that can serve a heuristic function for STS scholars attempting a more careful examination of neoliberalism. These common outcomes include: the rollback of public funding for universities; the separation of research and teaching missions, leading to rising numbers of temporary faculty; the dissolution of the scientific author; the narrowing of research agendas to focus on the needs of commercial actors; an increasing reliance on market take-up to adjudicate intellectual disputes; and the intense fortification of intellectual property in an attempt to commercialize knowledge, impeding the production and dissemination of science. Taken together, these shifts suggest that the impact of neoliberal science policy and management extends far beyond the patent system into the methods, organization, and content of science. We thus urge STS scholars to undertake a detailed exploration of exactly how the external political—economic forces of neoliberalism are transforming technoscience.

Keywords: commercialization, neoliberalism, political economy, privatization

Pen Drive for external OS

Freitag, 24. Juli 2015 - 12:44

Choosing pen drives (with flash memory) for external operating systems:

 
Not really suitable for external OS:

  • Sony 64 GB MicroVault Entry USB3.0 Pendrive [USM-64X/W], “up to 110 MB/s” reading speed: Slow writing. Perhaps the original partinioning is optimized for that drive. I didn’t test it with the original partition. Reformatting (as required e.g. for Linux) may not be recommended. As for NTFS, writing is very slow, but works.
  • I installed Linuxmint on a 64G SanDisk “Extreme USB 3.0″. It boots on an old EeePC 901, but not on a Lenovo 205. (2015-10-14)

On Windows 10

Montag, 9. März 2015 - 17:13

http://blowingupbits.com/2015/01/an-outsiders-perspective-on-windows-10-preview/

The Owl and the Pussycat

Mittwoch, 17. Dezember 2014 - 08:05

Just for fun: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/366410119658210356/

The return of the Class War

Montag, 1. Dezember 2014 - 13:59

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/nov/30/class-war-is-back-again

[...] unlike the disputed one at the centre of the libel case Andrew Mitchell has just lost. At issue there was whether or not he had called a policeman a “fucking pleb”. Although few us would feel confident about swearing at a policeman, that wasn’t the problem. It was the “pleb” that did for Mitchell.

Had he been accused of calling him an “fucking plod”, he’d probably still have a political career [...]

Actually, the class war never disappeared, but now it is clearly visible again.

An inspired M. C. Escher

Samstag, 12. Juli 2014 - 14:19

M. C. Escher’s art never really exited me. But it inspired many artists. As a kind of bycatch of my Snark hunt, I found that also Escher himself was open to inspiration from other artists.

M. C. Escher's allusion to John Martin's

[left] Maurits Cornelis Escher: Cimino Barbarano, 1929 (in Escher’s “Italian” period). This reproduction of the original print has been horizontally compressed and segments on the right side and of the left side of the image have been removed.
[right] John Martin: The Bard, ca. 1817, converted to grey shading, segments on the top and the bottom of the image have been removed.

Nosejob

Samstag, 28. Juni 2014 - 20:31

Be patient. This video is without sound. It doesn’t need any.

[start]: A horizontally compressed copy of “The Image Breakers” (1566-1568) aka “Allegory of Iconoclasm”, an etching by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder (British Museum, Dept. of Print and Drawings, 1933.1.1..3, see also Edward Hodnett: “Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder”, Utrecht 1971, pp. 25-29). I mirrored the “nose” about a horizontal axis.

[end]: The Banker after his encounter with the Bandersnatch, depicted in a segment of Henry Holiday’s illustration to chapter “The Banker’s Fate” in Lewis Carroll’s “The Hunting of the Snark” (scanned from an 1876 edition of the book)

Watch this animation with 480p: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06X98w0YvEU&hd=1

See also: http://www.ipernity.com/doc/goetzkluge/30595949
Two Noses